Forum Journal & Forum Focus

Forum Journal: Intangible Heritage (Vol. 32, No. 4) 

03-18-2020 16:59

Cover of Intangible Heritage Journal


This issue of Forum Journal focuses on how to preserve cultural heritage in the absence of historic places that represent that heritage.  Articles focus on specific communities and the efforts to preserve intangible heritage, as well as more general explorations of the topic. Articles included are about intangible heritage in African American, Latinx, Vietnamese American, immigrant, and coal mining communities throughout America in places as disparate as San Diego; Pennsylvania Coal Country; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Arlington, Virginia. Intangible heritage is also positioned within the context of historic preservation and the legal framework guiding the protection of historic sites. Finally, the notion of intangible heritage, itself, is challenged, with an article asking “If heritage is itself intangible, how can there be an intangible version of it?”

Table of Contents

  • Historic Preservation Without Place by Dennis Hockman
  • Away from Place: Expanding Intangible Cultural Resource Protections Under U.S. and International Law by Emily Bergeron
  • Is There Such a Thing as Tangible Heritage? by  Jeremy C. Wells
  • Shared Spaces, Invisible Imprints: Intersections of Latinx and African American Intangible Heritage by Sehila Mota Casper and Lawana Holland-Moore
  • Vestiges of Vietnam: Uncovering the Hidden Heritage of Virginia’s Little Saigon by Kim O’Connell
  • Engaging Communities to Identify Intangible Heritage in Minneapolis by Michael Tolan
  • Working-class Intangible Heritage from the Pennsylvania Coal Fields by Camille Westmont
  • Count the Outside Children! Kinkeeping as Preservation Practice Among Descendants of Texas’ Freedom Colonies by Andrea R. Roberts

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#intangibleheritage
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Author(s):Dennis Hockman, Emily Bergeron, Jeremy C. Wells, Sehila Mota Casper , Lawana Holland-Moore, Kim O’Connell, Michael Tolan, Camille Westmont, Andrea R. Roberts
Volume:32
Issue:4
Attachment(s)
pdf file
Forum Journal: Intangible Heritage (Vol. 32, No. 4   3.02 MB   1 version
Uploaded - 03-18-2020
pdf file
Historic Preservation Without Place   224 K   1 version
Uploaded - 03-18-2020
This issue of Forum Journal focuses on how to preserve cultural heritage in the absence of historic places that represent that heritage. Articles focus on specific communities and the efforts to preserve intangible heritage, as well as more general explorations of the topic. Articles included are about intangible heritage in African American, Latinx, Vietnamese American, immigrant, and coal mining communities throughout America in places as disparate as San Diego; Pennsylvania Coal Country; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Arlington, Virginia. Intangible heritage is also positioned within the context of historic preservation and the legal framework guiding the protection of historic sites. Finally, the notion of intangible heritage, itself, is challenged, with an article asking “If heritage is itself intangible, how can there be an intangible version of it?”
pdf file
Away from Place: Expanding Intangible Cultural Resource P...S   709 K   1 version
Uploaded - 03-18-2020
University of Kentucky historic preservation professor, Emily Bergeron, addresses how laws and legal frameworks regulating the preservation of intangible heritage lag well behind those related to historic places and objects. Bergeron explores U.S. and international conventions and accords that guide the preservation of intangible heritage, where they stop short or can be improved. Bergeron also acknowledges the Eurocentric nature of historic preservation guidelines, noting that international law is beginning to connect intangible heritage preservation with indigenous communities, and in doing so, those communities are being positioned to have agency over their heritage.
pdf file
Is There Such a Thing as Tangible Heritage?   355 K   1 version
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University of Maryland professor Jeremy C. Wells, contemplates the nature of cultural heritage, suggesting that heritage is innately intangible. The concept of intangible heritage, then, is tautological, akin to saying “intangible intangible.” Additionally, notes Wells, tangible heritage, the places and objects preservationists work to protect, is an equally absurd notion that assumes a “tangible intangible.”
pdf file
Shared Spaces, Invisible Imprints: Intersections of Latin...   787 K   1 version
Uploaded - 03-18-2020
Historic Preservation staff at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Sehila Mota Casper and Lawana Holland-Moore, explore how the experience and cultural heritage of African American and Latinx communities often overlap creating areas of common intangible heritage. By empowering communities of color to preserve both the tangible and intangible aspects of heritage and identity, historic preservationists can foster a greater understanding of the histories that connect individuals and communities to one another.
pdf file
Vestiges of Vietnam: Uncovering the Hidden Heritage of Vi...   620 K   1 version
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Journalist and daughter of a Vietnamese immigrant, Kim O’Connell explores the disappearance of places associated with Vietnamese immigrants to the Clarendon neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia, during the years following the end of the Vietnam War. As Vietnamese American populations were priced out of Arlington and moved deeper into the Washington, D.C., suburbs, the shops and restaurants associated with the “Little Saigon” commercial district in Clarendon vanished, but new efforts to preserve the intangible are ensuring the history of Vietnamese immigrants to the United Sates is represented as part of the broader historical narrative.
pdf file
Engaging Communities to Identify Intangible Heritage in M...   517 K   1 version
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Former Community Engagement Coordinator for the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota, Michael Tolan, reflects on his work in Minneapolis to engage diverse and marginalized communities around their intangible heritage. Central to this work was establishing trust and mutual understanding, developing new ways for professionals to talk about preservation with communities, and being proactive about building relationships.
pdf file
Working-class Intangible Heritage from the Pennsylvania C...   713 K   1 version
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V. Camille Westmont, doctoral candidate in anthropology at the University of Maryland, explores northeastern Pennsylvania’s coal mining region and the intangible heritage of the places that once were coal mine company towns. Miners and their families lived in poverty, and the coal companies controlled most aspects of their lives, from housing and food to commercial goods. The intangible heritage of the resource economy these families developed to survive is now all that is left of the coal mining era, with company towns now indistinguishable from other rural and suburban areas.
pdf file
Count the Outside Children! Kinkeeping as Preservation Pr...   682 K   1 version
Uploaded - 03-18-2020
Andrea Roberts, PH.D., assistant professor of urban planning and Faculty Fellow with the Center for Heritage Conservation at Texas A&M University, explores the intangible heritage of Texas Freedom Colonies. Though some buildings that were located in these freedom colonies remain, the names of the towns and settlements themselves have been changed, and there is no formal history of these places. Descendents of freedom colony residents keep the history alive through genealogy (kinkeeping) and family histories that, together, validate the significance of Freedom Colonies during the years immediately after emancipation.

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