Forum Connect

Preservation Plans

  • 1.  Preservation Plans

    Posted 04-09-2019 10:53

    I have been asked by a developer here in Southern Idaho to create a Historic Preservation Plan for a couple of older farm buildings.

    One is a bungalow cottage, and the other is old "ice house" used for storage.

    Are there any resources, or even templates that I could look at to create a plan?

    I have not done one before, but looking forward to it.

    Thanks

     

    Blaine O. Johnston, A.I.A.

    Architect

    (208) 861-5264

     



  • 2.  RE: Preservation Plans

    Posted 04-10-2019 11:49
    Oh! I have a similar, but different, request to Blaine's. Some neighbors and I are trying to get a historic district and we're trying to come up with the standards that would be put in place when the district is approved (if it is). Fort Collins only has 3 local historic districts right now and only the commercial district has standards specific to the district. So I've been trying to find examples that other communities use for residential districts that I could use as a template for ours. What I've found so far from Denver and Boulder are along the lines of a 2-page document describing the current character of the neighborhood, but there's nothing describing what infill/replacement development should look like for non-contributing properties, how large additions can be, etc. But that's what we'd like to have, so that all of the neighbors know exactly what they're getting themselves into. Any links to standards for residential districts would be appreciated. Thanks!

    It would be great if the National Trust had a "library" of links to example documents of things like this. :-)

    ------------------------------
    Meg Dunn
    Fort Collins CO
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Preservation Plans

    Ambassador
    Posted 04-12-2019 13:28
    @Blaine Johnston, one of the best resources for historic property owners is a historic structure report. Preservation Brief 43: The Preparation and Use of Historic Structure Reports provides a roadmap for preparing one, but they do come in all shapes and sizes depending on the resource. Be sure to look at the other Preservation Briefs, too, as well as the Preservation Tech Notes and even the Interpreting the Standards Bulletins can provide good information to include in the HSR.

    @Meg Dunn​​, the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions has a number of design guidelines online. Do a search for "residential" on the page in that link and maybe you'll find something that will help.

    Best,
    Barbara

    ------------------------------
    Barbara Howard
    Stonebridge Learning, LLC
    Minneapolis MN
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Preservation Plans

    Posted 04-12-2019 13:50

    Thanks, Barbara. I never would have thought to look there. That's a great resource!

    I clicked on several sets of guidelines (guidelines vs. standards. Now there's another question.) and they all seem to have been put together by an outside contractor or by the City. But since we're working on creating a historic district as a bunch of neighbors (Fort Collins requires historic districts to be developed at the grassroots level. The residents then bring the request to City Council who can grant designation.) I find these examples utterly overwhelming. There's no way we can put something together during our spare time and with little to no preservation training. It would take decades. 

    Does anyone here know of standards that were put together by the district residents? Or do most places get the district created first and then work on pulling district-specific standards together? 



    ------------------------------
    Meg Dunn
    Fort Collins CO
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Preservation Plans

    Ambassador
    Posted 04-12-2019 16:05
    Meg, you are right, a lot of design guidelines are done by consultants and can seem overwhelming if you are doing them on your own. The City of Minneapolis does some design guidelines in-house for some of our smaller districts and individual landmarks. They also try to involve the property owners/residents so that they have a say in what is written. For districts, our commission has been encouraging the city to develop guidelines in tandem with the district designation process so residents know what will be required (and hopefully support the designation).

    As an example, just before I joined the commission, design guidelines were developed for the Tilsenbilt Homes Historic District. They are extremely simple, though I have to admit that I was a bit surprised to see some of what is allowed. However, given the type of district and reasons for its significance, it made sense to keep the "rules" a little looser. That's one of the greatest benefits of doing design guidelines and HSRs - you use the Secretary of the Interior's Standards as a foundation, but can tailor the requirements to a specific property.

    Of course, Minneapolis does have dedicated planning staff, some of whom have preservation backgrounds. Have you considered tapping into the heritage-based programs at Colorado State? I seem to recall they have a public history program there, as well as the Center for Environmental Management. Sometimes universities look for real-world projects for student/public engagement. If they don't have a way to take it on as a student project, perhaps they could give you some leads to someone who could help lead the effort.

    Barbara

    ------------------------------
    Barbara Howard
    Stonebridge Learning, LLC
    Minneapolis MN
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Preservation Plans

    Posted 04-16-2019 17:03
    Thanks, Barbara! This is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for.  :-)

    ------------------------------
    Meg Dunn
    Fort Collins CO
    ------------------------------