Forum Connect

Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

  • 1.  Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-01-2019 12:44
    Edited by Colleen Danz 02-03-2019 19:24

    Continuing with the newly launched Ask Me Anything on Forum Connect* …

    Up next week (Feb 4-8) are the panelists on the February 5 TrustLive: Resaving Saved Places livestream (this virtual event at noon ET is free to join and is part of Colorado Preservation Inc's annual conference in Denver).

    The panelists are @Danielle Del Sol, the new executive director of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, @Anne Nelson, associate general counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and @Annie Levinsky, executive director for Historic Denver. They will be exploring the question, is a place ever truly saved? They will look at present-day threats at places such as New Orleans, Larimar Square in Colorado, and Ashley River Road in Charleston, and discuss protentional solutions.

    They will be logging on to Forum Connect the week of February 4 to answer your questions. Post a question before the event on Tuesday or livestream the TrustLive on Tuesday and then join a follow-up discussion here!

    Danielle, Anne, and Annie will be available to answer your questions Feb. 4-8. 

    Thanks,

    Colleen Danz your Forum Connect Community Manager

     *In the Ask Me Anything series we'll be asking people, whether around here at the National Trust or in the preservation field at large, to sign on to Forum Connect daily for a week to answer your questions about the work they do. These folks will make a point of coming to Forum Connect daily for a week to respond to your posts.

    ​​

    ------------------------------
    Colleen Danz
    Forum Marketing Manager
    National Trust for Historic Preservation
    Washington DC
    ------------------------------
    ​​​


  • 2.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-01-2019 14:18
    Edited by Sarah Marsom 02-01-2019 14:18
    For @Danielle Del Sol specifically, but would also love to hear from the other speakers if they have ideas.

    New Orleans has been struggling with tourism impacting the lives of city residents (most notably in the news - Airbnb causing housing issues). People love places like New Orleans (Charleston is also having this issue), because of how successful preservation has been... but there is clearly a balance that needs to be created for a healthy/ economically sustainable city for people at all points of entry (visitors/residents and ages/income levels/ethnicities).  How can historic preservation organizations like yours advocate for that balance between heritage tourism, sense of place, preservation of the built environment, and fostering desirable neighborhoods for full-time residents? ​

    ------------------------------
    Sarah Marsom
    Heritage Resource Consultant
    Tiny Activist Project
    me@sarahmarsom.com
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-04-2019 15:26
    Hey @Sarah Marsom ! Thanks for your great question. This is a huge issue we deal with on a daily basis -- and indeed, with a population around 400,000 and last year's tourism numbers topping 18 million, there is a huge amount of pressure placed on our city's historic built environment due to tourism. The tourist to resident ratio in New Orleans blows even cities known for tourism problems like Venice, Italy, away. But tourism is vital to our economy -- it's New Orleans' number one economic driver. So it's wonderful and we love it, but we have to be careful about its management.

    The local tourism management agency, New Orleans Tourism and Marketing Corporation, has launched amazing campaigns in recent years celebrating the authenticity of our city, and that has done much to get tourists out of the .66-square-mile French Quarter and out to explore the rest of the city. They have partnered with PRC to fund some of our similar endeavors -- we have developed and distribute free historic district guides for all of the city's National Register districts that include walking/biking tours, sites of interest and information that will satiate even an uncurious wanderer.

    Keeping residents in neighborhoods amid skyrocketing real estate prices is a big piece of my talk tomorrow, and there's a lot to be said, so let's follow up after my presentation. You're right, pressures from Air BnB and other short term rental operators have, data has shown, exacerbated an already problematic affordable housing crisis that is happening in New Orleans right now -- so PRC has been a staunch advocate against whole-house short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods. In addition to advocating for changes that prohibit these whole-house hotels -- changes that our City Council is currently considering through new legislation --​ we are working with city agencies and others to help short term rental operators get out of neighborhoods and into commercial corridors where hotels would already be allowed to incorporate. What's especially gratifying is seeing good short term rental operators establish units in blighted buildings that had been shuttered for years in commercial corridors. What a win! Short term rentals are here to stay, and they can be a wonderful option for savvy travelers. But working with operators to help them locate in areas that won't damage quality of life for residents who live here is important, and we're lucky to be having such conversations currently.

    Thanks for your questions and I look forward to talking more!

    ------------------------------
    Danielle Del Sol
    Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans
    New Orleans LA
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-04-2019 10:28
    Good morning, Forum Connect!  I am heading to Denver today, and very much look forward to participating in the TrustLive discussion tomorrow.  I will share our work to save (again) the Ashley River Historic District, which includes Drayton Hall--a National Trust Historic Site and a National Historic Landmark.  This historic district has twice been listed on the National Trust's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

    ------------------------------
    Anne Nelson
    Associate General Counsel
    National Trust for Historic Preservation
    Washington DC
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-04-2019 13:30
    Happy Monday everyone!  We're excited to welcome so many friends to Denver this week for Colorado Preservation, Inc.'s annual Saving Places Conference.  I am especially looking forward to tomorrow's TrustLive on Resaving Saved Places.  I've been with Historic Denver for fifteen years this year, the last ten as Executive Director.  Historic Denver is our city's local preservation advocacy organization, and we also offer technical assistance to owners of historic buildings, hold easements, do education programs, and we recently "resaved" our own flagship property, the Molly Brown House Museum, by reinvesting in the 1889 structure and increasing community access.

    Denver is among the country's fastest growing cities, and we we experience this boom cycle we find ourselves grappling with threats to places that are at the core of Denver's preservation story- including Larimer Square- our first protected historic district (1971).  Can't wait to hear more from all of you!

    ------------------------------
    Forum Member Historic Denver
    President
    Historic Denver Inc
    Denver CO
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-04-2019 15:32
    Hi everyone! Danielle Del Sol from the Preservation Resource Center in New Orleans here, I am excited to see everyone tomorrow in Denver for the TrustLive talk and panel. It's a true honor to serve as this year's keynote, and I am so excited to share with everyone the work we have been doing at PRC over the past year to address some of the new challenges our historic buildings and districts are facing. I hope to bring some extra inspiration to what is already an incredible lineup of speaker and sessions. Please feel free to ask any specific questions on this Forum Connect thread, I'd love to chat with as many of you as possible. I look forward to talking with you and sharing ideas with my esteemed colleagues Anne, Annie and Susan!

    ------------------------------
    Danielle Del Sol
    Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans
    New Orleans LA
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-05-2019 13:16
    @Danielle Del Sol

    Thank you for taking time to answer our questions! I only have two questions:

    1. Are the "Preservationists Keep it up Longer" shirts still available and, if so, where can I get one?​
    2. You mentioned working with other professionals for climate change solutions in your presentation. To what extent does this dialogue delve into environmental justice issues regarding public stormwater infrastructure? Particularly in previously disinvested communities (with historic structures) that are now gentrifying?

    Thanks again for taking time to answer our questions,

    ------------------------------
    Jamesha Gibson
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-06-2019 17:15

    Hi Jamesha!

    YES, our t-shirts are absolutely available, buy one for you and all your friends! :) Please click this link to purchase.

    Really great point about environmental justice issues and public infrastructure. We haven't delved that deep yet, but you're so right to flag it as something that warrants thoughtful consideration. Thank you!



    ------------------------------
    Danielle Del Sol
    Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans
    New Orleans LA
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-07-2019 11:46
    Jamesha - I don't want to derail this thread, but your second question is something we've been grappling with here in San Antonio through our Climate Action & Adaptation Planning process. The draft includes a section specifically about equity, and proposes a screening mechanism with questions specifically addressing displacement as well as cultural preservation. I'd be especially interested to hear your thoughts on it if you have time to take a look!

    ------------------------------
    jenny hay, PhD
    jenny.hay@sanantonio.gov
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-07-2019 12:24
    Wow, this is great. Thank you Jenny!

    ------------------------------
    Danielle Del Sol
    Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans
    New Orleans LA
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-08-2019 01:13
    Hi @Jenny Hay,

    THIS.IS.GOLD! I was so excited while reading it that I could barely sit still because it runs along the lines of my research on social vulnerability and equity in historic preservation disaster recovery! Planning through an equity lens allows for a more wide-ranging and just approach to climate change adaptation planning that traditional approaches previously could not accommodate. It is good to know that cities are beginning to incorporate this into their planning and policy making strategies!

    One thing I would encourage in this draft is that it digs deeper into its conceptualization and incorporation of cultural preservation as a theme in its Screening Mechanism. The draft cites cultural preservation as an equity theme focused on "respecting and honoring cultural relevance and history (pg.14)." As I understand it, this theme, then, focuses primarily on safeguarding the official recognition, representation and interpretation of historic places in communities of color. I believe that the impact, and subsequently the adaptation strategies, for the cultural preservation theme could go deeper by recognizing that Historic Preservation planning, policies, and practices are also included in "the systems that have established, and continue to perpetuate, the unequal burden of climate impacts (pg.12)" because of the laws, rules, regulations, and practices within the field that tend to marginalize places connected to the lives and legacies of socially vulnerable communities (a previous post on forum connect delves into this discussion). For example, "…[H]istoric, political, and economic systems which marginalize the poor and people of color…segregate and isolate minority groups within hazard prone areas and physically vulnerable structures. Thus, socially vulnerable groups are inextricably connected to physically vulnerable places […] These are the places that are often neglected or destroyed [.] Instead of protecting and advocating for these places, and the people whose lives are connected to them; the rules, laws, and regulations of historic preservation 'work with [and] perpetuate…these inequalities'" because the heritage of socially vulnerable groups does not fit into the value system and criteria set out in the National Register, and that are used by many preservation practitioners.1

    In acknowledging the ways that historic preservation practices have contributed to systems that created unequal impacts of climate change on socially vulnerable communities; we can see, with clarity, how much more intimately connected these systems are to threatening cultural preservation in communities of color. For example, because socially vulnerable communities were subject to segregationist policies, their neighborhoods may have previously received an unequal distribution of quality critical infrastructure (such as stormwater drainage, among other things). As a result, today, when extreme precipitation occurs, they suffer a disproportionate threat to their cultural heritage (which are also their homes, places of worship, etc.). With this in mind, when using the cultural preservation assessment in the Screening Mechanism, in addition to asking "does this [strategy] acknowledge/honor/respect the culture, historic assets, and traditions of communities of color?" One can also ask "has this (or a similar) strategy historically had a disparate impact on the access and accessibility/affordability/health/safety & security of communities of color which threatens their culture, historic assets, and traditions today? Will it continue to do so in the future?

    [I apologize for this post being so long, but I got really excited]

    Hope this helps,
    Jamesha

    Gibson, Hendricks, Wells. 2018. "From Engagement to Empowerment: How Heritage Professionals Can Incorporate Participatory Methods in Disaster Recovery to Better Serve Socially Vulnerable Groups." International Journal of Heritage Studies.

    ------------------------------
    Jamesha Gibson
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-05-2019 16:01
    Edited by Raina Regan 02-05-2019 16:02
    Thank you for a great Trust Live, @Danielle Del Sol, @Annie Levinsky, and @Anne Nelson! I especially appreciated the shout out for the value of easements in your keynote, Danielle!

    I recognize all of you have been great about reaching out to local governments and developers to avoid the typical preservation stereotype of being "anti-developer." Instead, it appears you are finding ways to create solutions and partnerships in a way that is appropriate and sensitive to the specific needs of your place.

    To continue the last question – is a place truly saved – I would be curious to hear what groups or types of persons have been the most difficult to "get on board" with the renewed threat and what has been a successful message or strategy to educate these groups. Has it been local governments, the community-at-large, or even fellow preservationists? ​​​​It seemed like an underlying concept was the idea that you have to reeducate and reengage your community about these threats and it would be interesting to hear what types of messages resonate well.


    ------------------------------
    Raina Regan
    Senior Manager of Easements
    National Trust for Historic Preservation
    Washington, DC
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Ask Me Anything (Week of Feb 4)-Resaving Saved Places Panelists

    Posted 02-06-2019 17:42
    Great question about getting the message out about re-saving saved places- and which audiences are hardest, or easiest, to reach.  I think engaging the community, whether its citizens, elected officials, or others, starts with education, because today's threats may not manifest quite the same way as the dramatically poised bulldozer moments of the urban renewal era.

    During the discussion yesterday complacency came up as an issue, and I think that's something that deserves more attention.  Even when "saved" places are not facing a threat, how do we express the value the preservation tool box, whether its designations, tax credits, design guidelines, easements, etc. contribute to the success and vibrancy of the place?  As decades pass it can be easy to take a protected place for granted, and forget the preservation infrastructure supporting it, along with the hard work, community activism, and policy decisions it took to save it in the first place.




    ------------------------------
    Annie Levinsky
    President
    Historic Denver Inc
    Denver CO
    ------------------------------