Telling the Full History Preservation Fund

Telling the Full History Preservation Fund

The guidelines and application for the Telling the Full History Preservation Fund will become available on this webpage on November 1, 2021. Applications will be due by 11:59 p.m. (your local time zone) on December 15, 2021. To receive the latest updates on this program, please join our grants interest list.

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In November 2021, the National Trust will begin accepting applications for the Telling the Full History Preservation Fund, a one-time grant program to help interpret and preserve historic places of importance to underrepresented communities across the country. This opportunity is made possible through the National Endowment for the Humanities’ (NEH) American Rescue Plan Humanities Grantmaking for Organizations.

The Telling the Full History Preservation Fund grant program will provide $25,000 and $50,000 grants to 60-80 humanities-based organizations working to interpret and preserve historic places of importance to underrepresented communities including, but not limited to, women, immigrants, Asian Americans, Black Americans, Latinx Americans, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and LGBTQIA communities.

Telling the Full History Preservation Fund grants aim to support the core activities of humanities-based organizations as the organizations recover from the pandemic and use historic places as catalysts for a more just and equitable society. Along with the grant funding, National Trust staff will provide technical assistance to grantees.

A broad range of humanities-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations are eligible for these grants, including state and local preservation organizations, historic sites, museums, historical societies, and genealogical associations, as well as accredited academic programs in historic preservation, public history, and cultural studies of underrepresented groups. Additionally, local and state governmental agencies, such as state historic preservation offices, tribal historic preservation offices, city and county preservation offices and planning departments, state and local commissions focused on different aspects of heritage, and publicly owned historic sites and museums can apply.

Funding will be awarded in these categories:

  • Research, planning, and implementation of humanities-based public interpretive programs that utilize diverse historic places to tell the full history of the United States;
  • Humanities-based research and documentation to enable local, state, and federal landmark designations to recognize places of importance to underrepresented communities;
  • Architectural design and planning to advance preservation and activation of historic buildings and landscapes that tell the full history of the United States;
  • Humanities-based training workshops to support underrepresented groups in preserving and interpreting historic places that tell the full history of the United States.