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Reuse and Revitalization in Jacksonville: Discovering the Value of Older Buildings and Blocks

The Preservation Green Lab is always looking for opportunities to test our idea that building reuse should be a key strategy for supporting community health, equity, and resilience. Our ongoing work building the Atlas of ReUrbanism does just that by quantifying the benefits that older...

Margaret O'Neal's profile image

Library Entry
Reuse and Revitalization in Jacksonville: Discovering the value of older buildings and blocks

In 2014, the Preservation Green Lab used statistical analysis and spatial modeling to measure the impact of older, smaller fabric on the performance of Seattle, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. The methodology has since been validated in a number of other cities, including Louisville,...

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Blog Entry
The Hidden Density of Older Buildings

Through ReUrbanism , the Preservation Green Lab staff has focused its attention on the relationship between old buildings and the challenges and solutions for cities in the 21st century. Our team lives and works in cities—including Seattle; Denver; Washington, D.C.; and New York—and we’re tuned...

Mike Powe's profile image

Blog Entry
How Older, Smaller, Mixed-Age Buildings Make a Difference in Tucson

My first visit to Tucson in 2014 was full of surprises: 111 degrees is hot, but it doesn’t kill you. Mexican food in Arizona is entirely different than Mexican food in my native Texas. (Both are delicious, for the record.) And, man, does Tucson have beautiful older and historic buildings...

Mike Powe's profile image

Library Entry
Older, Smaller, Better in Tucson

In 2014, the Preservation Green Lab used statistical analysis and spatial modeling to measure the impact of older, smaller fabric on the performance of Seattle, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. This report brings that methodology to a new location: Tucson, AZ. A collaboration with the city...

OlderSmallerBetterInTucson_PGL_NTHP_Nov2016.pdf

Mike Powe's profile image

Library Entry
Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring how the character of buildings and blocks influences urban vitality

All across America, blocks of older, smaller buildings are quietly contributing to robust local economies and distinctive livable communities. This groundbreaking study demonstrates the unique and valuable role that older, smaller buildings play in the development of sustainable cities. Building...

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Older Smaller Better

Reuse and Revitalization in Jacksonville Read the Report and the Appendices Older, Smaller, Better Report More Taking Older, Smaller, Better to Tucson Read More The Older, Smaller, Better project was made possible through the generous support of the Summit Foundation , the...


Library Entry
May 2014 Forum Focus: Putting the Older, Smaller, Better Report to Work for Historic Preservation

The National Trust’s Preservation Green Lab recently published a pioneering report, Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring how the character of buildings and blocks influences urban vitality . This 109-page report uses the vast amount of electronic data available to researchers today&mdash...

FFOSB.pdf


Blog Entry
Witnessing How Older and Smaller is Better

By: Sam Zacher Z-scores, standard deviations, statistical correlations. In a world of data and numerical trends, what good are descriptive observations? The National Trust’s Preservation Green Lab’s (PGL) research is predominantly quantitative and involves studying large...

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Blog Entry
Older Buildings, Livable Cities

National Trust President Stephanie K. Meeks gave the following remarks about livable cities on March 19, 2015, as part of the Wisconsin Historic Preservation Symposium at The Grain Exchange in Milwaukee. I am here with you in Milwaukee because I want to talk about cities, and...

Stephanie Meeks's profile image