ReUrbanism

Preservation & ReUrbanism

As cities grow and change, they should do so leveraging the assets they already have—the older buildings and blocks that have the enormous power and potential to improve health, affordability, prosperity, and well-being. Ultimately, it’s the mix of old and new buildings, working together to fashion dense, walkable, and thriving streets, that helps us achieve a more prosperous, sustainable, and healthier future. The National Trust’s work in cities to make adaptive reuse the default development option is called ReUrbanism—promoting building reuse as essential to economic growth and vibrant communities.

Ten Principles for ReUrbanism

To guide our work in ReUrbanism the National Trust has developed a list of principles for reuse and reinvestment in the 21st century.

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Latest Research
Partnership for Building Reuse: Detroit

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Atlas of ReUrbanism

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The Past and Future City

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Demonstration Project: Louisville, Kentucky

The Trust's work in Louisville is a key part of our work around ReUrbanism. By creating an urban laboratory in Louisville to test creative approaches to preservation issues and opportunities, the work of the National Trust and our local partners are seeking to create a sustainable preservation model for others cities across the nation.

Looking (and Getting) Past Crisis Moments in Preservation (Winter 2016 Forum Journal)

Demolition on Third Street in Louisville: Assets Lost, Opportunities Remain (2015)

Kicking-Off Green Lab Work in Louisville, Kentucky (2014)

Heart of Louisville National Treasure Page

Local Economy

Tips and tools on how retaining older, smaller buildings along historic commercial corridors is a smart economic development strategy.

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ReUrbanism on SavingPlaces

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Recent Posts on ReUrbanism