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The Preservation Leadership Forum recently released the newest issue of its Forum Journal : “ Preserving Difficult Histories .” This issue, published in partnership with the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience , focuses on the interpretation and preservation efforts at places associated with difficult, and often untold or underrepresented, histories. The articles present a wide array of tactics and strategies that emphasize the importance of place in interpreting some of our nation’s ...
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By Valerie Balint Artists’ homes frequently represent a unique combination of a domestic environment and a laboratory for experimenting with new modes of artistic expression. At home, unfettered by the need to satisfy patrons, the artist is free to try their hand at architecture, landscape design, decorative interiors—or all three. Sculptor Daniel Chester French’s summer retreat at Chesterwood in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, is an example such an environment—one personally conceived by the artist, ...
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Posts in  this series  about social media in preservation are digging deeper into community management, storytelling, advocacy, and more. Have questions? Reach out on  Forum Connect ! Also, keep an eye out for our sessions at  PastForward 2017 ! One of the biggest buzzwords in nonprofit digital and social media right now is storytelling. The current wisdom is that, in order to inspire people to become advocates and donors in support of our cause, we need to tell compelling stories ...
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The Forum Blog  is publishing a series   that responds to the question: When does historic preservation become social justice? The series explores multiple themes, including how preservationists can apply environmental justice to protect our most vulnerable communities. Two posts in the series share insights from environmentalists working at both the national and local levels about how and why preservation should address e nvironmental inequality in vulnerable and under-resourced communities, ...
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The United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement in early June ignited an international conversation about global climate change and its disproportionate effects on the world’s most marginalized and vulnerable communities. Given that the United States is responsible for almost a third of global carbon emissions and, historically, the most greenhouse gas emissions, we might well be expected to honor our commitment to limiting the impact of climate change. But figuring out what issues ...
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Over the coming months, we’ll be publishing our annual reading lists leading up to PastForward 2017. As always, these lists present curated videos, articles, and projects that we hope will spark discussions in Chicago come November 14–17. Early bird registration ends September 15. Register today! Many people are surprised when I refer to the preservation of old places impacting people’s health. Place—where someone is raised, where they work, where they live—has a profound impact on health ...
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By Andrew Wilkes The Forum Blog   is publishing a series   that responds to the question: When does historic preservation become social justice? In this post we examine the connection between historic preservation, social justice, and faith-based community organizing. Interested in starting a discussion about the series? Sign up for  Forum Connect . While community organizing collectives are diverse and pursue a variety of missions, at their core they are institutions that organize individuals ...
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On the evening of July 30, 2016, the historic center of Ellicott City, Maryland, was devastated by one of the strongest floods in its 250-year history. In less than 90 minutes, a torrential storm dropped more than six inches of rain. In addition to being a humanitarian nightmare, the flood also presented dramatic challenges for preservationists concerned about the well-being of this National Register of Historic Places district’s historic resources. One of the historic main street structures ...
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For years technology has aided historic preservationists in maintaining and cataloguing historic sites. Organizations such as CyArk are using 3-D scanning to capture the details of sites before they crumble or completely disappear. However, much of this technology costs more money than smaller organizations are able to raise. The need for affordable preservation technology persists. Students in New Jersey take part in an after-school Minecraft program. | Credit: Photo by Kevin Jarrett ...
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By Janet Hansen and Sara Delgadillo Cruz This year marks a milestone for historic preservation in Los Angeles with the completion of SurveyLA. The concept for the project began in 2000, when the Getty Conservation Institute initiated a multiyear feasibility study to review best practices and produce a framework for conducting the survey. The resulting blueprint provided the basis for a grant agreement between the city and the Getty Foundation, and by 2006 the new Office of Historic Resources ...
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​ Over the coming months, we’ll be publishing our annual reading lists leading up to PastForward 2017. As always, these lists present curated videos, articles, and projects that we hope will spark discussions in Chicago come November 14–17. Super early bird registration ends August 4.  Register today! In its June 2017 report on the implications of connectivity , the Pew Research Center for Internet & Technology stated that “today, 49% of the world’s population is connected online ...
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This summer Preservation Leadership Forum will publish a series of blog posts that respond to the question: When does Historic Preservation Become Social Justice? We hope that these posts will push readers to think broadly about our work to save historic places and how it connects to intersectionality and inclusion. Posts will be updated as they are added to the blog.   Rosa Parks’ childhood home near Abbeville, Alabama. | Credit: Photo  by  Pat Henson  licensed under  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 ...
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Last week the Forum blog began a series that responds to the question: When does historic preservation become social justice? In this next post we talk to three artists about where preservation, place, and art intersect with this important question.  Interested in starting a discussion about the series? Sign up for  Forum Connect . Public art—music, painting, or sculpture that expresses the history and culture of a neighborhood—tell the stories of the community’s past and its people. Public ...
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Over the coming months, posts in this series about social media in preservation will dig deeper into community management, storytelling, advocacy, and more. Written by staffers (and one former staff member) of the National Trust Social Media team you'll get a first hand look at the ways in which we approach social media for Saving Places. This page will be updated as posts are added.  An Evolving Approach to Social Media by Sarah Heffern An Evolving Approach to Social Media: Building ...
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As the appeal of living in a historic neighborhood continues to grow across the country, the arrival of short-term vacation rentals (STVRs) has challenged many residents to ensure that the “neighbor” stays in their neighborhoods. The result is a complex debate about the benefits versus negative effects of this $30 billion industry. Faubourg Marigny, New Orleans. | Credit: Photo by  Infrogmation of New Orleans  is licensed under CC BY 2.0 The National Trust is encouraged by ...
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What scientific evidence supports historic preservation? We study the economics of historic preservation and know that it supports a vibrant and sustainable economy . We research the environmental and energy impacts of historic preservation and know that the greenest building is the one that is already built . We research what people like and know that they prefer old places . But what about the so-called “softer” benefits of historic preservation? What studies support those notions of belonging, ...
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By Andrea Roberts Over the next six weeks the Forum blog will be publishing stories that respond to the question: When does historic preservation become social justice? We start with an introduction by Andrea Roberts, founder of the Texas Freedom Colonies Project and a scholar of heritage conservation and urban planning.  Interested in starting a discussion about the series? Sign up for  Forum Connect . William Murtagh, the first Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places wrote that, ...
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by Tim Mikulski Over the coming months, posts in this series about social media in preservation will dig deeper into community management, storytelling, advocacy, and more. Have questions? Reach out on  Forum Connect ! Also, keep an eye out for our sessions at  PastForward 2017 ! Your organization has established itself in the world of social media with accounts on multiple platforms. You are gaining followers and have come up with a plan to share out content on a regular basis. But ...
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By Khanh Vo and Mariaelena DiBenigno In video games, place is arguably one of the most important components to player engagement. From the smoke-filled streets of the “Silent Hill” series to the bloody battlegrounds of the “Call of Duty” franchise, video game makers carefully plan when and where to set the scene. Specifically, historically relevant locations help advance the games’ narratives and encourage a powerful, if unexpected, interactivity with the past. Though perhaps not the initial ...
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This issue of the Forum Journal , published in partnership with the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, explores interpretation and preservation efforts at places associated with difficult histories. Using a variety of approaches, preservationists and social activists across the country call on the power of place and narrative to illuminate some of the most painful chapters of our nation’s past. This work is vital not only because such history is frequently underrepresented and ...
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